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Posts tagged with stuff I wrote

21 Notes

29pco:

Maura Magazine, Issue 39, “Reset”.
Vinyl, Goonies, gamers, and fatigue. Plus poems by Rae Armantrout!
Download the app or subscribe on the web to read.

I wrote about Mountain Dew Game Fuel, video games, and parenting for the return of Maura Magazine. You can download it on your iOS device, you can read it on the web, but you need to get at this content, I worked hard on it.  Zoom Image

29pco:

Maura Magazine, Issue 39, “Reset”.

Vinyl, Goonies, gamers, and fatigue. Plus poems by Rae Armantrout!

Download the app or subscribe on the web to read.

I wrote about Mountain Dew Game Fuel, video games, and parenting for the return of Maura Magazine. You can download it on your iOS device, you can read it on the web, but you need to get at this content, I worked hard on it. 

24 Notes

Blogging turns 20: look back and cringe with us | Media | theguardian.com

I participated in this thing for The Guardian. It involved digging up an old Diaryland entry from infinity years ago and then reading it now and then talking about how it made me feel. It was a burdensome ordeal so please click through. Also choire is in there and his is good.

40 Notes

The Biography of Paul Ford — Internet Biographies — Medium

Years ago on livejournal I asked if anyone wanted me to write their biography. I wouldn’t write one for people I’d met in real life, I would only write bios for internet friends, based only on whatever I remembered about whatever they had posted about themselves online. (Which at that point meant websites/blogs/lj etc, this was before Twitter, or even Facebook, maybe?)

It was fun! They were not super good biographies—the main takeaway was that the pieces of ourselves that we put online never provide a complete (or even partially complete) look at who we really are. (Duh.) (A few reactions to what I wrote were along the lines of: “That’s what you think of me? OK!”). 

I’ve been wanting to do this again so I wrote Paul Ford’s biography. Paul is kind of an outlier in that I’ve been reading his writing for years, and a lot of what he puts online is about himself (as opposed to the average tumblr user, where maybe 1 out of 100 posts contains a speck of personal information?). 

I didn’t do any googling or additional research. Anyone can Google—what do you retain, is the question. What do you “know”. (As an additional exercise I only gave myself 10 minutes to generate ideas and 50 minutes to write and post the thing, which is why it’s extra crummy in parts and I wish I could go back and fix things, but that’s about my need for constraints, nothing to do with biographies in general.)

I didn’t tell Paul I was doing this but I hoped he wouldn’t mind. So I posted it and then a few days later he chimed in, adding notes on things I’d screwed up or gotten completely wrong. So now there’s an additional layer of things he’s chosen to say about himself online over the things I took away from the things he chose to say about himself online. 

The internet.

38 Notes

lizzystewartillustration:

YOU ARE THE FRICTION is an anthology of collaborative short fiction and illustration. It’s a small, bright red record of what happens when you introduce twelve writers to twelve illustrators, light a match, and run in the opposite direction. Twelve short stories inspired by illustrations, twelve illustrations inspired by short stories, all collected in a handsome paperback edition published by Sing Statistics.

I am in this! So are Tess Lynch, Josh Allen, Ian Dingman, Carson Ellis, Tom Gauld, Scott C, and a whole bunch of people who are far more talented than I. This is it! This is the gift idea you have been waiting for this holiday season! Zoom Image

lizzystewartillustration:

YOU ARE THE FRICTION is an anthology of collaborative short fiction and illustration. It’s a small, bright red record of what happens when you introduce twelve writers to twelve illustrators, light a match, and run in the opposite direction. Twelve short stories inspired by illustrations, twelve illustrations inspired by short stories, all collected in a handsome paperback edition published by Sing Statistics.

I am in this! So are Tess Lynch, Josh Allen, Ian Dingman, Carson Ellis, Tom Gauld, Scott C, and a whole bunch of people who are far more talented than I. This is it! This is the gift idea you have been waiting for this holiday season!

20 Notes

Guest Recommendations: Kevin Fanning – The Bygone Bureau

I wrote some recommendations for Bygone Bureau. They include Aaliyah and creative drinking and Teen Wolf. 

The short list of things I wanted to recommend but didn’t have space to write about included:

  • Internet Misandry
  • Writing in text files
  • the Rule 34 tag on tumblr
  • Ariana Grande’s twitter
  • Fruit Adventure Tic-Tacs

but anyway the stuff I did recommend is pretty solid.

11 Notes

From Beyond the Grave - The Morning News

Every Halloween TMN does this thing where people contribute endings to classic scary tales. This year it’s the one about the guy whose wife dies, but after the funeral he’s worried they buried her alive? And he wants to dig her up because he swears he hears her calling to him? So fucking sad. Like, too real, honestly. So some of these endings are funny or scary but mine’s definitely the saddest!!!!!

134 Notes

Emotional Transit

When I was young my family went to Ocean City Maryland every summer. There’s a boardwalk along the beach, and we’d walk different parts of it every evening as the sun set and the beach cleared out and the lights came up. I remember: french fries with vinegar, terrible haunted house rides that we went on multiple times, tourist shit-shops filled with pink & fluorescent yellow t-shirts (it was the 80s), sea shells with glued-on googly eyes, watching sand artists sculpt inspirational bible quotes into their castles. It was the best.

There was a little shuttle you could ride if you were tired from walking or wanted to skip to different parts of the boardwalk. One night we walked all the way down to the very end, and decided to take the shuttle back to our hotel. A few minutes into the ride a pair of young couples got on, cramming into the seat behind us. Probably what happened is my dad started making dumb jokes and they laughed politely, but what I remember is all of us having the best time on the ride home. My mom and dad laughing with them, everyone saying funny comments about things we saw along the way, strangers immediately connecting and bonding, on just the perfect night, the best time, driving very slowly along the beach at night.

Eventually we came to a stop and the couples climbed off the shuttle. I called out: “See you back at the hotel!” and they stopped and turned and my mom had to explain, No, they’re not staying with us, they’re going to do other things.

And I was like: We’re never going to see them again? Like, ever? I was not just distraught or sad but immediately inconsolable. These were our friends. How are these people who we just met and who we like so much, who we’ve had so much fun with tonight, going to disappear from our lives forever? We’re all ok with that? We’re all ok with going off into the night and never seeing each other again?

But of course that’s what happened. They walked off and we went back to our hotel and I’m probably the only person in the story who remembers any part of it happening, and none of it really matters, except that I still feel the sense of missing those people whose faces I don’t even remember as acutely as I did back then.

And I would love for the ending of this story to be: And that’s when I decided I didn’t need my heart anymore. But I do. I hate it, but I do.

15 Notes

openareas:

Special issue! Fall themed! Featuring guest writers kfan and writewood! Plus two stories from me! Download now!!
If you wanted to be in a guest issue and did not yet receive a photo from me, please email michele.catalano@gmail.com with the head 1/100. More guest issues coming up!
As always, you can download this issue as a single, or subscribe.

I wrote about the dark magic of pumpkin spice lattes for 1/100. 

openareas:

Special issue! Fall themed! Featuring guest writers kfan and writewood! Plus two stories from me! Download now!!

If you wanted to be in a guest issue and did not yet receive a photo from me, please email michele.catalano@gmail.com with the head 1/100. More guest issues coming up!

As always, you can download this issue as a single, or subscribe.

I wrote about the dark magic of pumpkin spice lattes for 1/100. 

65 Notes

A child’s name, on some level, reflects the parents’ hopes and dreams for the child. It is a kind of stamp on the thin envelope of their journey through life. They named their daughter North. They gave their daughter the language of direction, of adventure into the unknown, the hope of something better, something far away and potentially magical and interesting and better. They gave her elsewhere.

Kevin Fanning, “The Complete Biography of North West.”

For a few minutes, I felt something about Kanye and Kim that wasn’t weary resignation.

(via embfitz)

I wrote about North West! Kind of the unsung celebrity baby of the summer, imho. Also it’s about Trayvon & reproductive rights & #teens and a lot of other things too

14 Notes

image

 

Most basketball players lack vision. They think they are so amazing, running around in shorts and scoring baskets, when really there is so much more to life. Occasionally you find a basketball player who at least shows a little vision or heart. (It was very nice the way Michael Jordan saved the Looney Tunes characters with his basketball skills in Space Jam—though the human race and the planet Earth were never in any real danger, so it’s not like he is so special.)

Shaquille O’Neal, on the other hand, has his sights set a little higher. He’s going to actually save the human race—not from cartoon alien invaders, but from an evil far more pervasive and insidious. He is going to save us from ourselves.

— from my review of SODA SHAQ, the first truly spiritual soda, in Maura Magazine #30, available on the web or on your iPad or probably on your phone too, idk